Posts Tagged ‘ ASANDC ’

U7 Newsletter Debuts

We present to you U7’s Quarterly Newsletter! Our first edition!
We hope to keep all of our colleagues, partners, small businesses owners, business supporters, and the general public abreast of the small business support services we provide and how the project is progressing. Each quarter, the newsletter will be highlighting a Central Corridor small business owner and providing small business tips, advice and resources.

This is our way of showing our appreciation for your continued support of the small businesses that dot the Central Corridor Light Rail Transit Line.
If you have any ideas of a business to highlight, information you want to know more about, or have business tips or advice to share that we can add to future editions, please drop us a line.
Sia Lo, U7 Small Business Consultant, was the lead on the creation of the U7 Newsletter and with Steve Olson’s assistance (U7’s Graphic Designer), they have provided us (and you) with a great first edition.
We would also like to take the opportunity to thank our funders: Central Corridor Funders Collaborative, St. Paul Foundation, Bigelow Foundation, City of St. Paul STAR Program, and Federal Funds provided through Congresswoman Betty McCollum. The majority of our funders have supported the U7 project since April 2009, and due to their early support we have been able to get U7 services on the ground a whole two years before construction begins on University and Washington Avenues. THANK YOU!
Find out more about U7 here.

Summer of Peace

At peace pole

Community elder, Ms. Bertha Givins, and Dan Kravetz, who came up with the idea for Summer of Peace two years ago.

For the third straight year, the Aurora/St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation, partnering with the Summit-University Planning Council and District 7 Planning Council, co-hosted The Summer of Peace celebration, a series of events that was the brain child of former ASANDC staffer Dan Kravetz. This “traveling block party” with events happening each Thursday, provided an opportunity for neighbors to get to know each other and participate in activities benefitting the entire community. Thursday events included clean-up efforts, community gardening, live entertainment, cook-outs and the general spreading of goodwill and summer cheer.

We spoke with Irna Landrum, Executive Director of the Summit-University Planning Council, who shared some highlights from the Summer of Peace.

How did it go? It seemed like there was such a good feel to the events.

It definitely was a success, bigger than what we had done before, a bit overwhelming, but it went very well. We tried to do it a little differently, in the past it was more about getting out, seeing people and giving them information — more of a here’s where you go, here’s what you do, the food is over there kind of thing. We wanted it to be more interactive and thought it would be more successful if people could contribute and be engaged.

What were some of your favorite events?

The kickoff event was phenomenal. It was held on a vacant lot on Victoria and Concordia that had an interesting story: On that corner was a really dilapidated home. The neighbors wanted to buy and rehab it but that didn’t work out and the home was demolished. But they were able to buy the lot and wanted it to be an asset to the community. So we held the kickoff event there and did a peace pole planting and worked with a landscape designer, neighbors brought seeds and plantlings and we did a small vegetable garden right in the middle of the lot. Police officers, political candidates from the district, and lots and lots of neighbors came out to the party. It was just so awesome. The owners wanted everyone involved and asked for ideas about what could be done with the lot — they made a list: What I like to see is… and people voted.
Another great event was the forum in July with candidates from the Minnesota House of Representatives District 65A. When people start talking about politics it is easy to discount this neighborhood — people don’t turn out to vote — it seems easy to count out a community like ours. But that night we set out 50 chairs and we had to get more — nearly 60 people came out to ask the candidates questions. That was really rewarding

Also, we had a block party on Fuller Avenue at Chatsworth and Milton. We work with a group called Hearts and Hammers who help elderly and disabled homeowners rehab their houses. At that point Hearts and Hammers had done five houses on that block — now it’s up to seven.

How rewarding to see all that progress in one place.

It really was. And there was one event that just SWELLED. It started with an idea — our community organizer met this neighbor who drums, he plays the bongos and congas, and she asked if he would lead a drum circle. He said sure and then spread the word to his friends. It turned into multiple drummers, a stage and sound systems, it became a little block concert. It was a bit overwhelming, but all the neighbors had so much fun. And the original neighbor said he needed some work done on his house, and I handed him a Hearts and Hammers brochure and they ended up doing work on his house. It all fits together.

What do you see for the future? I mean after you rest up from this!

There are three community gardens all along Victoria Street in several different neighborhoods. We want to see what kind of community identity we can build along Victoria. It seems like some of the physical barriers are really big psychological barriers — the neighborhoods are very different, but it will be good to focus on what we have in common.

It seems we need a fresh perspective, it is easy to say, “Here are the challenges and difficulties,” but it is good to hear a fresh perspective of, “This is what’s beautiful!”

Brotherhood Inc.

Brotherhood-Inc

Nekima Levy-Pounds at Brotherhood Inc. gathering

The hustle and bustle on University Ave. on a Friday afternoon this summer was nothing compared to the buzz going on inside the Aurora St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation. The office was hosting University of St. Thomas associate law professor Nekima Levy-Pounds and the new local anti-gang initiative she is spearheading in the community.

Levy-Pounds, along with four University of St. Thomas law students and law clinic fellow Artika Tyner, is proposing a center in St. Paul devoted to serving African-American youth. The facility would act as a one-stop shop for social services and business enterprises that keep young people out of gangs. They are calling the initiative, Brotherhood Inc., and are targeting youth who have been involved in gangs or criminal activity who want to make positive changes in their lives.

The project is modeled after Los Angeles-based Homeboy Industries. The St. Paul initiative has named the project Brotherhood, Inc. with “Creating Change, Transforming Lives” as its tagline. Their mission statement is just as enterprising, setting forth the goal “To enable African-American youth and young adults to envision and achieve successful futures.”
Behind the press releases, community meetings and mission statement is a real energy to get things done. UST Law’s Community Justice Project, led by Levy-Pounds, is taking a leading role in making Brotherhood Inc. a reality. Tyner and Levy-Pounds have been moved by the gang activity, educational achievement gap and high incarceration rates that plague African-Americans in St. Paul.

“It has been an awakening for me, and I now have to bring the students along,” Tyner explains. She puts stock in the unique family feel that Brotherhood Inc. is designed to create. After learning about the commitment and connection among the people at Homeboy Industries, Tyner knew the same model could make a huge impact in St. Paul.
Levy-Pounds visited Homeboy Industries in 2007, and came back with a vision of starting something similar in St. Paul. Tyner said Levy-Pounds’s enthusiasm was infectious and got her to start looking at issues in the St. Paul community.

Getting dedicated students from the CJES program was an important part of creating the momentum this project needs to get off the ground.

“We don’t teach students just to ‘think like lawyers,’” Levy-Pounds emphasizes. “I think that is a shallow definition of legal education.”

Tyner and Levy-Pounds use the classroom to get to the bottom of race and class issues that affect disenfranchised youth.

Tyner explains that instead of being overwhelmed into inaction by these large social questions, “with these students, we can change the world.”

ASANDC has been an outspoken supporter of the Brotherhood Inc. project. Executive Director Nieeta Presley says that with focused action from diverse members of the St. Paul community, Brotherhood Inc. can be a reality sooner rather than later.

Remember Rondo

Aurora/St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation is opening RONDO’s Coffee Café at the new mixed-used development Frogtown Square on University Avenue and Dale Street in St. Paul. Commercial space is opening at the end of 2010; housing is opening in February 2011.

We are asking all of the RONDO Community and its FRIENDS to join in and help us make this realty come true by participating in our fundraiser. By supporting us, you will assist us in creating another legacy and tribute to the memory of the Rondo Community, help us create jobs for those that are most hard to employ, and help us create a mini-museum to those lives that made RONDO a great place to live, work, worship and raise us.

YOU ARE RONDO!

YOU can particiapte in one of three ways:

  • Buy the naming rights to a coffee, latte, or other beverage for $500 – name that special flavor after your family name
  • Buy a coffee table and emboss a picture of a family memory or great place to go that once existed in the RONDO neighborhood for $400
  • Buy a spot on the wall of fame with a picture of a family memory or great place to go that once existed in the RONDO neighborhood for $300

To see a sample table or to get more information stop by our office or contact:

Nieeta Presley
Aurora/St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation
774 University Avenue W.
St. Paul, MN 55104
651/222-0399
Email
Web

Governor Appoints MLK Council Members

Gov. Tim Pawlenty has appointed nine members to The Governor’s Council on the Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday. Diana Allen, Eugene A. Barringer III, Cheryl Chatman, Lester Collins (Chair), Jacquelyn Celeste Cooper, W. Rayford Johnson, Dora Ann Jones, Marilyn Porter and Dr. Carolyn Ruth A. Williams were appointed to terms that expire on April 3, 2011.

Barringer is an Aurora/St. Anthony NDC Board member and Porter is a staff member at ASANDC.

The Governor’s Council on the Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday was created in 1986 by executive order (Executive Order 86-11), and reauthorized by Governor Pawlenty in 2003 to plan the activities and events in observation of the Martin Luther King, Jr. federal holiday. The council consists of up to 15 members appointed by the Governor.

Unify University Parade Video

Coverage of the community parade along University Avenue in St. Paul to the Western Sculpture Park and the Hmong Arts and Music Festival on Aug. 21.

The parade was organized by concerned citizens and community groups, including the Metropolitan Interfaith Coalition on Affordable Housing (MICAH), the Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation (ASANDC), the Center for Hmong Arts and Talent (CHAT), the District 7 Planning Council, the St. Paul Council of Churches, and more. The groups were brought together by concerns over the light rail and want to show their care, concern and pride in the University Avenue communities.

Join Us for Community Gathering!

University Community logoSaturday, August 21, 10 to 11 a.m.

University between Western and Marion!

Public Assembly at Western Park 11:15!

We want a better University Avenue! We want a more unified University Avenue! The light rail is coming and we want to celebrate our community, and show our pride! And we want you to celebrate with us!

We will be going from Jackson School, along Thomas to Virginia, along Virginia to University, along University to Galtier and along Galtier to the Western Sculpture Park and the Hmong Arts and Music Festival!

After the parade, we will have a Public Assembly on the main stage at the Music Festival. We will be speaking about what brought us out from 11:15- 11:45!

This parade has been organized by concerned citizens and community groups, including the Metropolitan Interfaith Coalition on Affordable Housing (MICAH), the Aurora-St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation (ASANDC), the Center for Hmong Arts and Talent (CHAT), the District 7 Planning Council, the St. Paul Council of Churches, and more. We have been brought together by concerns over the light rail, and want to show our care, concern, and pride in the University Avenue communities.

We are still accepting registrations, if you wish to participate in the parade! (Contact Vaughn Larry at ASANDC at 651-222-0399 or by email. ) We would love to see you either in the crowd, in the parade, or at the Hmong Arts and Music Festival! For further information, contact John Slade at 651-491-2084 or by email.