Posts Tagged ‘ Central Corridor Funders Collaborative ’

U7 Newsletter Debuts

We present to you U7’s Quarterly Newsletter! Our first edition!
We hope to keep all of our colleagues, partners, small businesses owners, business supporters, and the general public abreast of the small business support services we provide and how the project is progressing. Each quarter, the newsletter will be highlighting a Central Corridor small business owner and providing small business tips, advice and resources.

This is our way of showing our appreciation for your continued support of the small businesses that dot the Central Corridor Light Rail Transit Line.
If you have any ideas of a business to highlight, information you want to know more about, or have business tips or advice to share that we can add to future editions, please drop us a line.
Sia Lo, U7 Small Business Consultant, was the lead on the creation of the U7 Newsletter and with Steve Olson’s assistance (U7’s Graphic Designer), they have provided us (and you) with a great first edition.
We would also like to take the opportunity to thank our funders: Central Corridor Funders Collaborative, St. Paul Foundation, Bigelow Foundation, City of St. Paul STAR Program, and Federal Funds provided through Congresswoman Betty McCollum. The majority of our funders have supported the U7 project since April 2009, and due to their early support we have been able to get U7 services on the ground a whole two years before construction begins on University and Washington Avenues. THANK YOU!
Find out more about U7 here.

Sustainable Development Events

Central Corridor light rail station rendering

From St. Paul City Council Member Russ Stark:

I’d like to invite you to an upcoming visit to Saint Paul by Brian Coleman from the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center in Brooklyn, NY. He will be coming to share his experiences and insights on providing space for small manufacturing enterprises, artisans, and artists. GMDC currently owns and manages five rehabilitated properties occupied by more than 100 businesses that employ more than 500 people.

There will be two events on Thursday, November 4, that are open to the public — one a working lunch and the other an evening session.

University United, Public Art Saint Paul, the Saint Paul Port Authority, the Asian Economic Development Association, and the Midway Chamber, and I have put up funds that will be matched by the Central Corridor Funders Collaborative to make this visit possible. The topic to be discussed dovetails with the current efforts of the West Midway Study and Creative Enterprise Zone Study (University and Raymond area), as well as larger city-wide economic development conversations.

For more information and to register for the November 4 lunch, please click here. Please register soon, as space is limited

If you plan to attend the evening session on November 4, please go here for more information and to RSVP.

Thank you for your interest, and I look forward to this upcoming opportunity for dialogue about the Greenpoint model and similar possibilities for our local economy. I hope you can join us.

Questions? Contact:

Samantha Henningson
Councilmember Russ Stark’s Office
Email
(65) 266-8641

Transit Workshop

Transit meeting

Community engagement continues to be a central issue in development and planning. When engagement is poorly managed, community members may feel an incoming assault in their neighborhoods, which can make or break a project.

“A lot of folks have anxiety about builders coming into their community,” said Leslie Moody, executive director of the Denver-based Partnership for Working Families, while presenting to an audience of over 100 participants on May 11 as part of a workshop focused on developing transit-oriented districts and walkable communities.

Held at the Wilder Foundation, the workshop, titled Equitable Development and Community Benefits, was the third in a four-part series. The session centered on leveraging a community benefits model, which builds relationships between the community, the developer and the city.

“We want the public involved in government,” said Moody. “Having active civic engagement in these processes is the way to get people to understand government and support it.”

Not all communities are created equal as pointed out by Gretchen Nicholls of the Twin Cities Local Initiatives Support Corporation, a leading sponsor of the event series.

“Community is a term we use very easily, although it’s a very complex idea,” she said.

After Moody’s presentation, participants shared success stories from their local areas and discussed topics related to points of influence in planning, timing mismatch, connecting on different priorities, and engaging communities over time.

A panel of local community organizers offered perspective. The panel included Russ Adams, Alliance for Metropolitan Stability; Gretchen Nicholls, LISC / Corridor Development Initiative; Malik Holt-Shabazz, Harrison Neighborhood Association; Mihailo (Mike) Temali, Neighborhood Development Center; Jonathan Sage Martinson, Central Corridor Funders Collaborative; and Brian Miller, Seward Redesign.

Common themes involved engaging developers early on, the role of small business, and ensuring community involvement beyond planning and throughout implementation.

Event sponsors included Twin Cities LISC, Metropolitan Council, Central Corridor Funders Collaborative, Center for Transit-Oriented Development, Urban Land Institute and The McKnight Foundation.

The last workshop, Financing of Transit-Oriented Districts – Building Public/Private Partnerships will be from 9 a.m. to noon June 15 at Dorsey & Whitney, 50 S. 6th Street, Minneapolis. For registration details, email Gretchen Nicholls.