Posts Tagged ‘ Wilder Foundation ’

Neighborhood Leadership Program Accepting Applications

Hands

The Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, in collaboration with the Minnesota Historical Society, is accepting applications for the six-month Neighborhood Leadership Program. Join a diverse group of 30 people to explore neighborhood involvement and develop leadership skills to take effective community action. If you live, volunteer or work in a Saint Paul neighborhood, are between the ages of 16-99, and want to connect with others who make a difference in their community, then this opportunity is for you. Apply for NLP by September 27.

Session Topics Include:

  • Understanding Your Leadership Style
  • Working Inclusively in Neighborhoods
  • Navigating City Government
  • Drawing on Community History to Take Action Today

Dates and Times:

Kick-Off Retreat: November 5-6, 2010

Two sessions per month

One Tuesday evening, 5:30 pm — 8:30 pm

One Saturday, 9:00 am — 3:00 pm

Attendance at all sessions is expected. Childcare and transportation are available — please request on your application. $100 is due upon acceptance into the program. Scholarships are available.

For more information:

Click here for a downloadable information and application packet.

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Transit Workshop

Transit meeting

Community engagement continues to be a central issue in development and planning. When engagement is poorly managed, community members may feel an incoming assault in their neighborhoods, which can make or break a project.

“A lot of folks have anxiety about builders coming into their community,” said Leslie Moody, executive director of the Denver-based Partnership for Working Families, while presenting to an audience of over 100 participants on May 11 as part of a workshop focused on developing transit-oriented districts and walkable communities.

Held at the Wilder Foundation, the workshop, titled Equitable Development and Community Benefits, was the third in a four-part series. The session centered on leveraging a community benefits model, which builds relationships between the community, the developer and the city.

“We want the public involved in government,” said Moody. “Having active civic engagement in these processes is the way to get people to understand government and support it.”

Not all communities are created equal as pointed out by Gretchen Nicholls of the Twin Cities Local Initiatives Support Corporation, a leading sponsor of the event series.

“Community is a term we use very easily, although it’s a very complex idea,” she said.

After Moody’s presentation, participants shared success stories from their local areas and discussed topics related to points of influence in planning, timing mismatch, connecting on different priorities, and engaging communities over time.

A panel of local community organizers offered perspective. The panel included Russ Adams, Alliance for Metropolitan Stability; Gretchen Nicholls, LISC / Corridor Development Initiative; Malik Holt-Shabazz, Harrison Neighborhood Association; Mihailo (Mike) Temali, Neighborhood Development Center; Jonathan Sage Martinson, Central Corridor Funders Collaborative; and Brian Miller, Seward Redesign.

Common themes involved engaging developers early on, the role of small business, and ensuring community involvement beyond planning and throughout implementation.

Event sponsors included Twin Cities LISC, Metropolitan Council, Central Corridor Funders Collaborative, Center for Transit-Oriented Development, Urban Land Institute and The McKnight Foundation.

The last workshop, Financing of Transit-Oriented Districts – Building Public/Private Partnerships will be from 9 a.m. to noon June 15 at Dorsey & Whitney, 50 S. 6th Street, Minneapolis. For registration details, email Gretchen Nicholls.